“You can think of quasars as lighthouses in the dark of the early universe.”

Possibly answering what came first: galaxies or black holes?

#Space

Sun, Mar 12th, 2017 11:00 by capnasty NEWS

Ultra-distant quasars are so rare that only 60 have been discovered so far — that in itself a remarkable achievement. Reportedly, by being able to see these quasars, researchers will get a view of what the primordial universe looked like and how it operated. Additionally, it may answer the question as to what forms first: the galaxy or the supermassive black hole at its centre.

"You can think of quasars as lighthouses in the dark of the early universe," said Roberto Maiolino, a professor of experimental astrophysics at the Cavendish Laboratory of the University of Cambridge and director of the Kavli Institute for Cosmology, Cambridge (KICC). "Just as a lighthouse's beam might shine on nearby land forms, making them visible from far away, quasars enable us to investigate the very distant universe and understand the physics of primordial galaxies."

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