In an Era of Mass Surveillance, Technology Companies are Responding to the Demands of their Customers

#Privacy

Sat, Oct 18th, 2014 21:00 by capnasty NEWS

Although Apple's encryption on the iPhone 6 has sparked both sceptics doubting its efficacy, as well as criticism from law enforcement agencies, Wired's Ken Gude argues that in an era of Government mass surveillance, this kind of "encryption is clearly in the public's interest."

Comey wants us to believe that the elimination of the key could allow violent criminals to “go dark”—thus evading detection and arrest. It is possible to construct a hypothetical scenario in which the only evidence of criminal activity is stored on a suspect’s personal device, consists only of data not backed up in cloud storage, and is not in the possession of third parties like telecommunications carriers or app developers. But none of the criminal cases cited by Comey meet that hypothetical because in real life those instances would be extremely rare and far outweighed by the clear public benefit of preventing the very real threat of a large-scale data breach that could affect millions of Americans.

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