"Spies do not give their material to newspapers."

#Opinion

Wed, Jan 22nd, 2014 20:00 by capnasty NEWS

Worried by Martin Luther King’s influence, J. Edgar Hoover’s FBI tried to frame the man as a communist in order to discredit him. Failing to do that, they discovered he was having affairs and, after collecting "the most incriminating clips," they sent them to him anonymously with a letter telling him to kill himself. This may sound shocking for our times, yet fitting for a government to do in the 60s. And yet, the same thing is happening right now with Edward Snowden:

Jump forward fifty years, and here is what NSA analysts and Pentagon insiders are saying about ubiquitous-surveillance whistleblower Edward Snowden:

“In a world where I would not be restricted from killing an American, I personally would go and kill him myself. A lot of people share this sentiment.”

“I would love to put a bullet in his head. I do not take pleasure in taking another human beings life, having to do it in uniform, but he is single-handedly the greatest traitor in American history.”

“His name is cursed every day over here. Most everyone I talk to says he needs to be tried and hung, forget the trial and just hang him.”

Sounds kinda familiar, doesn’t it?

Meanwhile, Marc Thiessen, conservative commentator and previously George W. Bush speech-writer, is saying this:

Amnesty? Have they lost their minds? Snowden is a traitor to his country, who is responsible for the most damaging theft and release of classified information in American history. [...] Maybe we offer him life in prison instead of a firing squad, but amnesty? That would be insanity

Today, the third Monday in January, is Martin Luther King day.

Ever notice how we don’t have a J. Edgar Hoover day?

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