Programmable Automaton from 1770 with 6,000 Moving Parts

#Robots

Wed, Nov 6th, 2013 11:00 by capnasty NEWS

On the This is Colossal website, a gallery complete with videos of a 240-year-old drawing boy automaton that uses 6,000 moving parts and is entirely programmable.

Designed in the late 1770s this incredible little robot called simply The Writer, was designed and built by Swiss-born watchmaker Pierre Jaquet-Droz with help from his son Henri-Louis, and Jean-Frédéric Leschot. Jaquet-Droz was one of the greatest automata designers to ever live and The Writer is considered his pièce de résistance. On the outside the device is deceptively simple. A small, barefoot boy perched at a wooden desk holding a quill, easily mistaken for a toy doll. But crammed inside is an engineering marvel: 6,000 custom made components work in concert to create a fully self-contained programmable writing machine that some consider to be the oldest example of a computer.

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