Contour Crafting: 3D Printing an Entire House

#Future

Wed, Oct 30th, 2013 12:00 by capnasty NEWS

The industry tap website brings to attention this project by Contour Crafting that involves the equivalent of a giant 3D printer capable of making a 2,500 sqft house in just 20 hours.

We have seen huge advancements in 3D printing. We’ve even seen oversized wrenches printed that measure 1.2 meters in length. Now, we can print an entire 2,500 sqft house in 20 hours.
In the TED Talk video below, Behrokh Khoshnevis, a professor of Industrial & Systems Engineering at the University of Southern California (USC), demonstrates automated construction, using 3D printers to build an entire house in 20 hours.

The above image is from the Contour Crafting website.

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