Rogue Planets, Planets Not Orbiting a Star, Are Nothing Special and a Dime a Dozen

#Space

Wed, Jul 17th, 2013 10:00 by capnasty NEWS

On Nautilus, a fascinating look by Thomas James on rogue planets, planets that unlike the Earth, don't orbit any star. The thing is, notes Thomas, "starless planets may be a dime a dozen."

Rogue planet. The term suggests a loner — a rebel refusing to play by the rules, breaking with tradition, going anywhere in the galaxy it pleases. Labels such as “rogue,” “nomadic,” and “wandering” are common in the media coverage of the recent discoveries of planets that might not be in orbit around any star. The romantic anthropomorphism is understandable. It’s also inaccurate. What’s potentially important about these objects isn’t that they’re the James Deans of the cosmos. They’re not. Their significance, if they exist, would be even more radical: They could be the new normal.

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