"If an astronaut cries in space, do their tears fall?"

#Science

Thu, Apr 18th, 2013 11:00 by capnasty NEWS

On the Canadian Space Agency YouTube channel, Canadian Astronaut Chris Hadfield takes questions from school children and adults about life in space. One such question: if an astronaut cries in space, do their tears fall?

On Earth, of course, it’s gravity that causes tears to roll down the cheek. In a microgravity environment, if an astronaut is sad or gets something in his/her eye, tears will certainly well up, but there will be none of what Smokey Robinson’s tears made on his face.

Hadfield, possibly the most social media-savvy astronaut ever with more than 500,000 Twitter followers, gamely demonstrates that tears do pool under the eye but they make no tracks. Squirting water into his right eye, he rolls his head around, causing the puddle of “tears” to shift back and forth and even roll over the bridge of his nose.

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