"[Facebook is] the bathroom door that resists all efforts at locking, swinging open again and again while you're trying to poop."

#Internet

Tue, Feb 12th, 2013 20:00 by capnasty NEWS

With Facebook having some clear privacy issues we're all familiar with and Instagram losing membership when its controversial terms of service were announced, people have been switching to Yahoo's Flickr service. Previously on the cusp of being pulled, "following its app roll-out, traffic went up instead of down for the first time in years."

[...] Flickr still doesn't have the speed or single-nature of Snapchat, but its current app does give it, at long last, Instagram's immediacy. And it has always had better privacy policies than Facebook. Here's what it gets right: If you're on the go, you can fire up the app and share timely snapshots in-app and on the move. You can mark them private, or limit the number of people who can see it to as few as one person. But it also stores full-resolution copies of your pictures, as many as you'd like. Go home. Log in to the website. Upload pictures from your DLSR -- all of them. Go ahead, the site gives you unlimited storage for $25 a year.

And that's the thing: Flickr feels like a permanent home. While sharing is great, it turns out that as we progress in our digital lives, as we take more and more photos and share them more and more places, we eventually want to go back and see them again. (Which explains the popularity of services like TimeHop.) We want to revisit them. We want to relive them.

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