Real-Life Batman

#Childhood

Thu, Mar 29th, 2012 20:00 by capnasty NEWS

You may have heard of the real-life Batman driving around in Montgomery County with an all-black Lamborghini. He made the news when he was stopped for using the bat-symbol for plates. Michael S. Rosenwald of The Washington Post investigates who this character is and discovers that this Batman doesn't fight crime, but is a hero none-the-less.

The Caped Crusader is a businessman from Baltimore County who visits sick children in hospitals, handing out Batman paraphernalia to up-and-coming superheros who first need to beat cancer and other wretched diseases.

[...] Batman is 48. He is a self-made success and has the bank account to prove it. He recently sold, for a pile of cash, a commercial cleaning business that he started as a teenager. He became interested in Batman through his son Brandon, who was obsessed with the caped crusader when he was little. "I used to call him Batman," he told me. "His obsession became my obsession."

Batman began visiting Baltimore area hospitals in 2001, sometimes with his now teenage son Brandon playing Robin. Once other hospitals and charities heard about his car and his cape, Batman was put on superhero speed dial for children's causes around the region. He visits sick kids at least couple times a month, sometimes more often. He visits schools, too, to talk about bullying. He does not do birthday parties.

His superhero work is limited to doing good deeds, part of a maturation process in his own life. In his earlier years, he acknowledges that he sometimes displayed an unsuperhero-like temper and got into occasional trouble with the law for fights and other confrontations. Putting on the Batman uniform changes and steadies him.

  558

 

You may also be interested in:

Everything You Need to Know About Kony 2012, Invisible Children and Attention-Based Advocacy
Facebook is Amazing Because it Feels Like You're Doing Something Even if You're Really Not Doing Anything
Canadian Teens Launch First LEGO Man into Space
Mother of All Hot Wheels Tracks, All 2,000 Feet of It
Distinct things I remember from my childhood