Made in China: 30-Story Prefab Skyscraper Built in 15 Days

#Technology

Sun, Feb 12th, 2012 10:00 by capnasty NEWS

In a feat of engineering, Broad Group, a Chinese building company, constructed a 30-story hotel in just 360 hours using prefabricated materials. Judging from the timelapse video above, the entire thing went up like it was made of LEGOs.

From the article in the Los Angeles Times:

Raising a 30-story tower in two weeks is possible because most of the work is done in a factory and the foundation has been laid ahead of time.China's abundance of workers also helps.

But a job done quickly is not always a job done well. [Zhang Li, a Beijing architect] said that in their race to the finish line, many Chinese construction companies skimp on the meticulous reviews and inspections that make projects in the West drag on for years.

"Incredible speed also means incredible risk," he said. "But only time will tell how serious the risk is."

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