U.S. Police Reads Your Email, Facebook and Instant Messages

#Internet

Tue, Apr 19th, 2011 10:00 by capnasty NEWS

According to Jeremy Kirk, in this TechWorld article, American law enforcement agencies can easily get access to electronic communications without having to report any of these requests.

Law enforcement organizations are making tens of thousands of requests for private electronic information from companies such as Sprint, Facebook and AOL, but few detailed statistics are available, according to a privacy researcher.

Police and other agencies have "enthusiastically embraced" asking for e-mail, instant messages and mobile-phone location data, but there's no U.S. federal law that requires the reporting of requests for stored communications data, wrote Christopher Soghoian, a doctoral candidate at the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University, in a newly published paper.

"Unfortunately, there are no reporting requirements for the modern surveillance methods that make up the majority of law enforcement requests to service providers and telephone companies," Soghoian wrote. "As such, this surveillance largely occurs off the books, with no way for Congress or the general public to know the true scale of such activities."

  791

 

You may also be interested in:

The Air Force’s Rules of Engagement for Blogging
Microsoft launches latest browser
Everything You Need to Know About the Net Neutrality Strike Down
"The scariest part of the NSA revelations."
Tab Closed; Didn't Read: Not Putting Up With Content Obscuring