What's the Sudden Big Deal with Government Spying, Anyway?

"The vast international global eavesdropping network has existed since shortly after the second world war."

#Privacy

Mon, Feb 16th, 2015 10:00 by capnasty NEWS

In 1988 (that's not a typo), investigative journalist and forensic expert Duncan Campbell wrote an article for the New Statesman Society titled Somebody's listening [PDF]. In it, Campbell explains how the 5 eyes already had the ability to intercept every kind of communication, including civilian, everywhere in the world. That was 26 years ago.

The vast international global eavesdropping network has existed since shortly after the second world war, when the US, Britain, Canada, Australia and New Zealand signed a secret agreement on signals intelligence, or "sigint". It was anticipated, correctly, that electronic monitoring of communications signals would continue to be the largest and most important form of post-war secret intelligence, as it had been through the war.

Although it is impossible for analysts to listen to all but a small fraction of the billions of telephone calls, and other signals which might contain "significant" information, a network of monitoring stations in Britain and elsewhere is able to tap all international and some domestic communication circuits, and sift out messages which sound interesting. Computers automatically analyse every telex message or data signal, and can also identify calls to, say, a target telephone number in London, no matter from which country they originate.

  1783

 

You may also be interested in:

It Might Be Time to Uninstall Google Chrome
"It’s increasingly hard to opt-out of online tracking."
Internet-Enabled Toys Ask Too Many Questions
“Only people with postgraduate levels of education could properly understand Instagram’s terms and conditions.”
Social Media Sites Can Learn Lots About You Even if You Are Not a Member