Seawater as Jet Fuel

Converting carbon dioxide and hydrogen recovered from seawater into usable hydrocarbon fuel

#Technology

Wed, Nov 26th, 2014 21:00 by capnasty NEWS

The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory showcases how it was able to recover carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen (H2) from seawater and convert them to a liquid hydrocarbon fuel. The fuel was then used in an off-the-shelf two-stroke internal combustion engine to successfully power an RC plane's flight.

In the second step these olefins can be converted to compounds of a higher molecular using controlled polymerization. The resulting liquid contains hydrocarbon molecules in the carbon range, C9-C16, suitable for use a possible renewable replacement for petroleum based jet fuel.

The predicted cost of jet fuel using these technologies is in the range of $3-$6 per gallon, and with sufficient funding and partnerships, this approach could be commercially viable within the next seven to ten years. Pursuing remote land-based options would be the first step towards a future sea-based solution.

  1098

 

You may also be interested in:

History Lesson: How Dad Used To Save Files
Why Did Trains Have Cabooses and Now Don't Anymore?
Control Two Robotic Arms Using Your Feet
Mars Rovers celebrates five years
The Computers That Power Man's Conquest of The Stars