What Porn Stars Can Teach Us About Privacy

#Opinion

Sun, Mar 9th, 2014 11:00 by capnasty NEWS

On SundayReview section of The New York Times, Stoya explains what it is like to find yourself doing porn and what that means about your privacy.

I DIDN’T expect to become a porn star. People rarely do. I was 19 years old, and my photographer roommate had an offer from a website to buy some nude pictures. We did a shoot and then waited two weeks in case I woke up in a panic over the idea of releasing naked photos of myself into the world. But I didn’t, and so I turned to the required paperwork. One of the boxes to fill in read “Stage Name (if applicable).”

[...] I wasn’t a voluptuous sex symbol or exotic glamazon. How big could the market be for pasty young women with wacky sartorial tastes and wiry limbs? I expected my orifices to be viewable in high definition by anyone with an Internet connection. I did not expect to have a career as a performer in hard-core videos, much less to see photos of myself on magazine covers or to be regularly recognized on the street. It would be ragingly narcissistic to assume that over 150,000 people would follow you on Twitter because of your work in pornography. But eight years later, that’s exactly what has happened.

  1005

 

You may also be interested in:

News flash: Your kid isn't special
Barack Obama is a Bigger Danger to the U.S. than #WikiLeaks
Copyright is Killing Science
Don't Blame Sara Palin or the Tea Party for the Gifford Shootings: Blame Guns
This Is My Abortion: Woman Took Cellphone Pictures of Her Abortion to Demystify Pro-Life Imagery